From sexyhotbeauty: Ten Easy Steps To Getting Started In Hiking

Today’s guest post, albeit a “stylized” one, which you’ll readily notice if you click through. My conclusion? When all else has you in conniptions, hire an experienced guide. Like me, for instance.

Ever dreamed of hiking but do not exactly know where to start? Don’t worry. You are not alone. You are one of the many who have chosen to embark in the process of staying fit by means of hiking. But good hikers haven’t reached that level literally and figuratively overnight. They were also briefed on some basic things every hiker must know.

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It’s our fault

Choosing bonehead technology over trees. Where are we headed from here?

Choosing technology over trees.
Where are we headed from here?

I’ve been reading some of the posts on Cutter’s blog. In one of them, Whose fault?, Cutter, with reference to a Nature Conservancy study, examines why there’s been a nine-year decline in visitation to our National Parks. He raises such questions as “Are we distracted too much by toys and technology?” and “Is it a case of today’s generations going soft and lazy?”

Says Cutter:

“We’ve become afraid of the outdoors. And worse, we have no patience for it. In the process, we’re driving out our natural need to remain connected to the outdoors.”

I have heard — yes, even felt — that siren call of the outdoors for so many years that it’s almost hard for me to grasp that most other people don’t hear it. So Is Cutter’s pronouncement true? Sadly, I feel that it is. Just look at today’s trends — we as a global society tend to admire style over substance, as if being fashion-conscious rates higher than exploring our natural surroundings.

As parents, it’s our fault — we’ve failed to honor the relationship with Nature that we once enjoyed as kids. We’ve failed in our commitment to pay it forward.

Nature giveth. Nature also taketh away. Which is why we need to remain connected to Nature.

But time accelerates. It’s not a case of “need to” — we MUST. We must place less emphasis on our supposed need for toys, set them aside often, and realign ourselves with what’s really real out there. We must honor the real and the tangible (the real rock.) We must continually strengthen our natural connection with our one-and-only Mother Earth, and do it as a matter of course — as part of our educational system, and as part of educating each other, young and old.

It’s either that or hurtle pell-mell toward oblivion because we can’t persuade enough of the next generation that this planet — whether in the macrocosm of global warming or the microcosm of local disappearing species — is worth saving. If we as a society choose to lose our connection to Nature, the consequences are deeply foreboding.

Tell your friends to “go take a hike.” Better yet, take them by the hand, and lead them. I can help

~winehiker

Winehiking, pure and simple

Did you know that the San Francisco Bay Area has more miles of hiking trails per capita than nearly any other region in North America?

Yup, it does.

Don’t ask me how I know that – it’s a conclusion I’ve reached over the last few years, having scoured many hundreds of websites, blogs, forums, and newsletters, and having shared trail chatter with untold numbers of folks who love to hike.

When you add that to the amazing supply of California wineries in the Bay Area – and the great wines that they produce – you can see the potential for winehiking as the next big thing to appeal to active vacationers near and far.

Just think about it for a moment. There’s an incredible number of people who simply love to get outdoors for fresh air and exercise. Whether it’s to provide balance to stressful lives, whether it’s discovering new places, or whether it’s being with friends doing fun things, pursuing outdoor activities is very much a California pastime, if not also a favorite activity the world over. Of the percentage of the population that is active outdoors, I’ve seen evidence which indicates that the greater bulk are fond of hiking.

By the same token, a very large percentage of the world population reveres fine wine. And that population is growing. It doesn’t hurt that medical experts are expounding wine consumption – in moderation, of course – as a very healthy way to combat Nature’s ills. Add that to the notion that in recent years, not only are more people worldwide drinking wine, but they are drinking higher-quality wine for a relatively reasonable price – especially in California – and you have the makings of a true winehiking revolution.

I wish I could give you hard numbers. But I’ll leave that to the industry analysts. All I can say is that I believe I’ve got something good here with this notion of winehiking.

I hope you agree. And if you do, let me know your thoughts. Please, whether I’ve met you personally or not. Because I’d really like to know what you think. Just click the leave a comment link to share your feedback, your rebuttal, your experience – even your passion.

Do you think there’s a future in winehiking? Because you read this blog, chances are that you do.

~winehiker